Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Jha can has random thoughtz about tapirs, kitties, comics, pretty people, social justice, things in general.

 

Posts tagged racism

jcoleknowsbest:

hussieologist:

the-fittest-bitch:

cyb3ranthy:

white-people-be-like:

When will they learn

*Tells racist joke to black guy’s face* “It’s just a prank!” 
White people on youtube: They’re such animals.

this is fucking disgusting. I hope this guy gets more than a punch in the face. 

Beat his ass

this shit is so disgusting.. Animals..

and you know they’re considering the retaliation, the expression of anger, to be a form of entertainment

(via freshmouthgoddess)

boygeorgemichaelbluth:

covenesque:

jean-luc-gohard:

unimpressed2chainz:

like 100% need to know why ppl don’t hesitate to justify cops killing a black person ‘maybe they were stealing’ wow black life is that disposable to you good to know

In case they don’t hear you, though:

When you say, “Maybe they were stealing,” you’re saying, “That candy bar was worth more than that black kid’s life. That teenager’s life, his college years, the possibility of a career and a family and a home, is worth less than a dollar.” And you know damn well they wouldn’t say that about a white kid. They’d be talking about the kid’s future and calling for justice. But we’re worthless to them. We’re not even worth a fucking single dollar.

THANK YOU

And tbh I don’t even believe the so called reason the police give. They literally say anything and know they can get away with it.

“That candy bar was worth more than that black kid’s life. That teenager’s life, his college years, the possibility of a career and a family and a home, is worth less than a dollar.”

(via ultralaser)

zuky:

Let’s talk about the racist notion, deeply embedded in US culture, of Asians as perpetual foreigners. Specifically, maybe you heard about this massive facepalm from US Congress just last week.
At a congressional hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday, July 24, 2014, Florida Republican Congressman Curt Clawson (above, left) addressed Nisha Biswal (right) and Arun Kumar, two US citizens and senior officials working for the US State Department and US Commerce Department, with these words:

“I’m familiar with your country. I love your country. Anything I can do to make the relationship with India better, I’m willing and enthusiastic about doing so. Just as your capital is welcome here to produce good-paying jobs in the U.S., I’d like our capital to be welcome there. I ask cooperation and commitment and priority from your government in so doing.”

Needless to say, Biswal and Kumar are Indian Americans who hold senior position within the US government, and were introduced as such at the hearing, but the Tea Party Congressman repeatedly spoke to them about India as “your country” and “your government”. An incredibly awkward silence was finally broken when Biswal said: “I think your question is to the Indian government.”

zuky:

Let’s talk about the racist notion, deeply embedded in US culture, of Asians as perpetual foreigners. Specifically, maybe you heard about this massive facepalm from US Congress just last week.

At a congressional hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday, July 24, 2014, Florida Republican Congressman Curt Clawson (above, left) addressed Nisha Biswal (right) and Arun Kumar, two US citizens and senior officials working for the US State Department and US Commerce Department, with these words:

“I’m familiar with your country. I love your country. Anything I can do to make the relationship with India better, I’m willing and enthusiastic about doing so. Just as your capital is welcome here to produce good-paying jobs in the U.S., I’d like our capital to be welcome there. I ask cooperation and commitment and priority from your government in so doing.”

Needless to say, Biswal and Kumar are Indian Americans who hold senior position within the US government, and were introduced as such at the hearing, but the Tea Party Congressman repeatedly spoke to them about India as “your country” and “your government”. An incredibly awkward silence was finally broken when Biswal said: “I think your question is to the Indian government.”

on personal experiences of anti-Indian racism in an ethnic studies classroom

kittyvontrubble:

nitanahkohe:

so i don’t think i posted it on here yet, but basically my lecture this week went terrible. the topic (as listed on the syllabus) was “case studies in racism: the american indian experience;” some of the lows of the class include 60-70 white kids yelling at me so loud that i had to yell at them to be quiet at the top of my voice, a white girl telling me she’s “5% Navajo” and that gives her the right to berate me in my own classroom, bizarre tone-policing, and multiple students trying to undermine me and belittle the material by saying things like “the Florida Seminole mascot is an accurate educational tool,” “you’re saying Native Americans are the only ones who experience racism and that’s racist,” “i’m not personally responsible for genocide or racism and i feel terrible about it, but i can’t change it so stop holding me accountable,” and my personal favorite, “you’re only saying this stuff because you’re Native and bitter—i don’t respect you and don’t wanna have this conversation, i don’t have to say shit.” 

it was so bad that about 10-15 students (mostly students of color) came up to me after class to apologize for their classmates’ embarrassingly immature & racist behavior. one of them even said that the class was scary and he was surprised that i didn’t start crying halfway through the lecture. the one cool thing is that those select few students could point to their peers and say that they were an excellent example of how ingrained racism is—that people with passing grades in an ethnic studies class can still pull shit like that and think it’s ok shows that they’re regurgitating rhetoric and not processing this really, and that there’s still deep-rooted racism in that room. 

i had expected some resistance, because this area has a history of pretty overt anti-Indian racism and this campus has not responded well. our ethnic studies department has no Native or indigenous faculty, and i’m the only Native grad student. there are 5 Native grad students total on this entire campus (we are a VERY large public land-grant institution in close proximity to quite a few large Native communities). last semester when a Native faculty member was beaten within an inch of his life just a block off campus, the university didn’t even send a press release or emergency notification for days. my department (ethnic studies) does not offer a grad-level Native or indigenous studies course, and does not require those who teach intro to ethnic studies to have a curriculum culturally sensitive to Native peoples. i asked my department head if i could be added to a faculty meeting agenda to discuss curricula changes and anti-Indian racism in our department, and i was told that was not the “appropriate forum,” and a (thus far unscheduled) private meeting would be best. in both undergrad and grad classes, each time we have had our 1 token reading or class period on “Native issues,” it’s gone terribly, i have been totally and openly disrespected, and i’ve left the class furious and hurt. in day to day interactions with colleagues, i have been told i’m “too ghetto for grad school,” that reservation Indians are lawless drug-addicted criminals, that if Native women don’t want to be raped they should leave their reservations, and that i bear the burden of on-demand proof of Native experiences of genocide. 

i’m fed up, and i’m leaving. i was supposed to stay for my PhD (and was given funding to do so), but i’m graduating early with my MA and would not come back to this institution under any circumstance. my two-year stint here has been so traumatic, i’m taking a break from academia in general—i’m now working for an organization run by and for Native women, and am not planning on pursuing a PhD for a few years at least. this is not about painting myself as a victim, but to be real about how hostile a space as allegedly “radical” as an ethnic studies dept can be to Native students; for my own personal wellbeing, i have to take a breather from this shit. honestly, if i do go back into academia, i think in the long term my goal is to be teaching at a tribal college—i would rather be paid a third of what i could get teaching at a non-tribal institution and working with Native faculty & students, than deal with this shit on the regular for more money and recognition.

in the meantime, i have to teach intro to ethnic studies again next semester, as well as finish up TAing for it this semester. i’m completely rewriting my curriculum and while i wish it didn’t have to be this way, the repeated and consistent horrible experiences i’ve had have demonstrated that i have to treat that classroom like the battleground the students are making it into. it’s really unfortunate because that kind of atmosphere works to the detriment of all of us—it’s exhausting and traumatic for me, and not the ideal learning environment for them. 

i have been begging and demanding support from faculty and administration essentially since day 1, and i have yet to see or hear anything from them at all except “wow that’s totally inappropriate i can’t believe it! so not ok, that needs to change!” (it should be noted these comments have not manifested any concrete changes in departmental or institutional curricula, dynamics, or accountability).

people do not want to be reminded of how ignorant they are, or how complicit in violence they are. i get it. but you’re losing dedicated scholars and educators like myself (and all the students i could have recruited or helped to retain!), and not only reinforcing colonial power structures and systems of domination, but perpetrating colonial/racist violence yourself. 

please read every word of this and realize this woman’s experience is  not the exception in academia—this is absolutely the rule. academia is one of the most virulently racist institutions i have ever personally experienced and it should be held accountable for the way it systematically drives out intelligent, passionate, and extraordinarily gifted marginalized students.

(via tariqk)

seekingwillow:

bankuei:

jhenne-bean:

desidere:

kamidoodles:

pugchacho:

desidere:

you didn’t even try to be subtle with “The Earth Queen is bad.” 

aka she’s clearly modeled after Empress Dowager Cixi, one of the most vilified women in all of Chinese history whose name is heavily associated with the racist stereotype of the “Dragon Lady”

gross

this makes me hella mad x2 because of either bryan or mike’s comments last year about how ‘yeah there are TOTES women in power like the EK has a woman on the throne’

Like.

Thanks.

yes….thank you…..you totally modeled her after Cixi and then made her a bad person which enforces the stereotype of her being a ruthless, uncaring, and evil ruler. 

AWESOME. 

I was just thinking that. And it was Bryan responding to criticism of the reduced/roles/screentime/told not shown writing of women in LoK:

I can answer these for you now.Thereare women world leaders in the Avatar world during Korra’s present: Zuko’s daughter is the Fire Lord, and there is an Earth Queen ruling the Earth Kingdom.

ha ha

hahahah

I’m reminded of when I asked the creators at the BSG panel about the fact that Black folks were the only ones showing up in non-Western clothing (dashikis etc.) and they said, “Oh there’s going to be LOTS of Black folks”

and the next season we had a Black guy prowling around in a cage half naked.

___

I’m not even reblogging stuff at this point, just sharing pain via fanmail (and open to email), cause I just don’t want to add to traffic and public name mentions at this point.

The entire scenario set up for B3 is ismist; racist, sexist, orientalist, chauvinist, us western imperialist, misogynist, plutocratist, ablist, and more.

There’s dark sites for crying out loud! In other people’s territories! And yet another set of moustache twirling villains.

And once again the Dai Li are inscrutable seemingly unthinking martial arts boogey men and just… gah.

(Source: claidilady)

ethiopienne:

beytwerk:

that bell hooks quote about white people being scared of violence from black people made me think about how in a culture defined by and built on white supremacy, violence has been defined in a very specific way that makes sure that white people can see themselves as victims and acts of violence against black people can hide behind laws and regulations, i.e. school to prison pipelines, drug laws, racial profiling. So a lot of violence that happens to black people has been codified in society to be seen as transgressions on our part and not as acts of violence against us.

the linked bell hooks quote:

I am always amazed when I hear white folks speak about their fear of black people, of being the victims of black violence. They may never have spoken to a black person, and certainly never been hurt by a black person, but they are convinced that their response to blackness must first and foremost be fear and dread. They too live in denial. They claim to fear that black people will hurt them even though there is no evidence which suggests that black people routinely hurt white people in this or any other culture. Despite the fact that many reported crimes are committed by black offenders, this does not happen so frequently as to suggest that all white people must fear any black person. 

Now, black people are routinely assaulted and harassed by white people in white supremacist culture. This violence is condoned by the state. It is necessary for the maintenance of racial difference. Indeed, if black people have not learned our place as second-class citizens through educational institutions, we learn it by the daily assaults perpetuated by white offenders on our bodies and beings that we feel but rarely publically protest or name. Though we do not live in the same fierce conditions of racial apartheid that only recently ceased being our collective social reality, most black folks believe that if they do not conform to white-determined standards of acceptable behavior they will not survive. We live in a society where we hear about white folks killing black people to express their rage. We can identify specific incidents throughout our history in this country whether it be Emmett Till, Bensonhurst, Howard Beach, etc. We can identify rare incidents where individual black folks have randomly responded to their fear of white assault by killing. White rage is acceptable, can be both expressed and condoned, but black rage has no place and everyone knows it.”

(Source: grapeson, via eshusplayground)

Anti-Racism Terms masterpost

White Fragility: white people’s lack of psychological stamina in dealing with issues of race and racism due to being sheltered from ever having to deal with it on a daily basis

Dysconscious racism: the tacit acceptance of racist ideology which absolves the racists from having to do anything about inequality.

Aversive racism: when you loudly disavow racism and you consciously know it’s bad, but you act hella racist anyway, not by demonstrating hostility, but by being, y’know, averse to dealing with Black folx and other minorities.

Colorblind racism: when you consciously know racism is a bad thing but when a POC tells you something happened because of racism, you cannot believe it and keep trying to attribute the racist encounter to something else, because you’re colorblind! you don’t see race.

all of these forms of racism feed into each other! POC, arm yourselves with this knowledge. White people, do some soul-searching with this strong academic work that’s already been done for you.

cumbersome-cucumber:

odinsblog:

#yesAllWomen

image

also a lot of people are leaving out the fact that he was also very anti-asian as well as anti-black, as if being anti-black is the most important thing in the world. Both are serious transgressions. Both should be mentioned, neither one should be left out.

I also saw someone emphasizing that he’s half-Asian himself, not just white, which, sigh.

(via dianchuoidi)