Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Jha can has random thoughtz about tapirs, kitties, comics, pretty people, social justice, things in general.

 

Posts tagged indigenous people

neeta-inari:

fuck yeah ainu!

(Source: thisisnotjapan, via selchieproductions)

we-wretched-shall-rise:

Indigenous forest defenders in solidarity with #IdleNoMore in Cheran, Michoacán

we-wretched-shall-rise:

Indigenous forest defenders in solidarity with #IdleNoMore in Cheran, Michoacán

(Source: new-here-again, via lavienoire)

littleangrytiger:


babyneesh:


IDLE NO MORE! SUPPORT FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE OF CANADA!!


that is the best protest sign

littleangrytiger:

babyneesh:

IDLE NO MORE! SUPPORT FIRST NATIONS PEOPLE OF CANADA!!

that is the best protest sign

(Source: kellycoast, via fastestcatalive)

idlenomore:

By Aaron Paquette

idlenomore:

By Aaron Paquette

(via selchieproductions)

deluxvivens:

poc-creators:

baapi-makwa:


“Ojibwekwe” - 1901


ridiculously gorgeous outfit. ridiculously gorgeous girl. 

fall back, hipsters.

deluxvivens:

poc-creators:

baapi-makwa:

“Ojibwekwe” - 1901

ridiculously gorgeous outfit. ridiculously gorgeous girl. 

fall back, hipsters.

(via karnythia)

android-eighteen:

snowysavageprincess:

mohawkballz:

digatisdi:

littleangrytiger:

furose:

oliviaturbo:

mazhogimaakwe:



cotton-candy-babeh:



Cowboy and Indians. :)




no this is a real indian giving you the bird
hi
yeah
stop



another real ndn giving u da bird

stunitaapsi


PREACH


DAMN RIGHT


ᏪᎾ ᏲᏁᎦ ᏨᏍᎩᎾ!


Nothing better than a train of ndn’s flipping off racists

android-eighteen:

snowysavageprincess:

mohawkballz:

digatisdi:

littleangrytiger:

furose:

oliviaturbo:

mazhogimaakwe:

cotton-candy-babeh:

Cowboy and Indians. :)

image

no this is a real indian giving you the bird

hi

yeah

stop

another real ndn giving u da bird

image

stunitaapsi

image

PREACH

image

DAMN RIGHT

image

ᏪᎾ ᏲᏁᎦ ᏨᏍᎩᎾ!

image

Nothing better than a train of ndn’s flipping off racists

image

image

(via colorfullymad-deactivated201304)

This is artwork by this month’s Steampunk POC: Beth Aileen Lameman, Anishinaabe Mètis!! It’s called River of the Star Beings, and it continues a theme she has been exploring in her recent work, so please pop over to my steampunk blawg to check out what she has to say!!

This is artwork by this month’s Steampunk POC: Beth Aileen Lameman, Anishinaabe Mètis!! It’s called River of the Star Beings, and it continues a theme she has been exploring in her recent work, so please pop over to my steampunk blawg to check out what she has to say!!

Oklahoma woman serving 12 years for pot case released from prison

OKLAHOMA CITY — Patricia Spottedcrow once faced 12 years in prison, but on the morning she was released on parole, it took less than 20 minutes to walk free.

Spottedcrow had to call a friend to pick her up from Hillside Community Corrections Center in Oklahoma City, her mother hadn’t even arrived from Kingfisher yet when corrections guards asked Spottedcrow to leave the prison’s grounds.

Her friend drove her to a nearby pharmacy parking lot, so she could reunite with her mother, Delita Starr, and her attorney, Laura Deskin.

“Oh, man, this is wonderful!,” Spottedcrow said. “I’m so excited I can’t take it!”

She was released Thursday morning after completing the community corrections-level portion of her sentence required by Gov. Mary Fallin as a condition of her parole. She entered prison Dec. 22, 2010.

Spottedcrow’s 12-year prison sentence for selling $31 worth of marijuana garnered widespread attention after her story was featured in a 2011 Tulsa World series on women in prison.

She was originally handed a 12-year sentence in a blind plea before a judge for selling a “dime bag” of marijuana to a police informant. It was a first-time offense, but because children were in Spottedcrow’s home when she was arrested, a charge was added for possession of a dangerous substance in the presence of a minor.

Gov. Fallin agreed in July to approve parole for Spottedcrow upon the unanimous recommendation of the Pardon and Parole Board.

Corrections officials had told Spottedcrow her release date would be sometime near Dec. 15, but she was told this week it would be even a little earlier than planned.

Starr wiped away tears as she hugged her daughter in the drugstore parking lot.

“It’s been a long time coming,” she said.

Spottedcrow’s reunion with her four children - now ages 11, 6, 5 and 3 - would have to wait a few hours, until the school bus arrived back in Kingfisher. The children were in school and daycare and Starr didn’t want to ruin their perfect attendance records, she said.

The women hugged and thanked all the people who had prayed, written letters and offered support to the family since Spottedcrow began serving her prison sentence in 2010.

“We’ve got a new road and we’ve got to travel it together,” Starr said.

Deskin, Spottedcrow’s attorney, said she first heard about her client’s case through the Tulsa World article and local activists, and was “absolutely shocked” at what had happened in Oklahoma’s legal system.

Now, they plan to focus on the possibility of post-conviction relief for Spottedcrow and possibly modifying the 30-year suspended sentence Starr received for her role in the crime, Deskin said.

[Source: Tulsa World]

(Source: blackndns, via deluxvivens-deactivated20130417)

velocicrafter:

francios:

poly—nesian:

eeeeks:

nativequeen:

love.

gives me chills. <3

this is probably one of my most favourite waita

so here’s a rad thing!

if I’m understanding correctly, this looks like a form of traditional Maori dance w/some modernised elements added. :o)

(via snarkbender)

Pe’ Sla Returns to Oceti Sakowin

Just got this in my email:

This afternoon at 2:00 pm MST in Rapid City, South Dakota, full ownership and control of the sacred sitePe’ Sla, located in the Black Hills, was officially returned to the Oceti Sakowin (Great Sioux Nation). We would like to offer our sincere and heartfelt congratulations to the Oceti Sakowin on its return of the control of this sacred site to all the people of the Nation and its relatives today and for all future generations.

Many of you have been following the collaborative effort to raise the $9 million purchase price for the 1,942 acre parcel of land that contains Pe’ Sla since it was first announced in August that the Reynolds family planned to sell the land at auction to the highest bidder. The area known as Pe’ Sla by the Lakota is one of five holy sites for the Nation and the only one not on public land. This area is particularly important in that it is the site of the Lakota origin story and star knowledge. While recognizing that the ownership of this land and the remainder of the Black Hills is still disputed by non-Indians, gaining control of this site was an opportunity too good to pass up and too important not to fight for.

It has truly been an honor for Indian Land Tenure Foundation and Indian Land Capital Company to be a part of this remarkable effort and to work with the Lakota and Dakota nations and other partners over the past few months.Indian Land Capital Company, ILTF’s affiliate lender, was able to provide $900,000 in rapid financing in order to help the tribes secure the initial purchase agreement.

In the end, all of the tribes of the Oceti Sakowin will have contributed time, effort and scarce funds to make this transaction possible. It is anticipated that each tribe will also participate in the oversight and management of the land to ensure its spiritual and cultural values. 

We have been extremely humbled by the outpouring of support from across the country and the world. Our many thanks to all those who contributed to the Pe’ Sla fundraising efforts of LastRealIndians and ILTF. Whether large or small, each contribution meant a great deal to the effort and said much about the donors’ commitment to righting a long standing injustice. 

As Indian people, we are faced every day with the loss of our sacred lands and the way in which this has impacted our communities, families and cultures. History being what it is, we recognize that our struggle to recover these lands will be difficult and long but we do not accept that these losses are permanent. The return of Pe’ Sla today has renewed our spirit. To see so many people willing to support the rights of American Indians and the return of Indian land makes us hopeful that there is a growing number of people that understand the magnitude of what we have lost.