Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Jha can has random thoughtz about tapirs, kitties, comics, pretty people, social justice, things in general.

 

Posts tagged for the herd!

Samuel R. Delany, “Racism and Science Fiction” (1998). (via wildunicornherd):
Because we still live in a racist society, the only way to combat it in any systematic way is to establish—and repeatedly revamp—anti-racist institutions and traditions. That means actively encouraging the attendance of nonwhite readers and writers at conventions. It means actively presenting nonwhite writers with a forum to discuss precisely these problems in the con programming. (It seems absurd to have to point out that racism is by no means exhausted simply by black/white differences: indeed, one might argue that it is only touched on here.) And it means encouraging dialogue among, and encouraging intermixing with, the many sorts of writers who make up the sf community.

Do You Want A Say On WisCon’s Direction?

To All WisCon Committee and Program Committee members:

As many of you know, the Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy & Science Fiction, or SF3, is the corporate parent of WisCon. SF3 is the entity that actually enters into contracts and puts on the convention, and SF3 bears the ultimate responsibility for the event and its consequences. If a year ever occurs in which no volunteer steps forward to chair the WisCon planning committee, the officers of SF3 would be faced with the choice to either co-chair the convention themselves or to cancel it outright. 

The members of SF3 meet only once a year. At that annual meeting, officers are elected, any proposed new or changed bylaws are discussed, and other official business discussed and decided.

One vital part of the official business at every annual meeting is approving or vetoing the individual(s) who have volunteered to chair the upcoming convention.

The next annual meeting of the Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy and Science Fiction is scheduled for Sunday, October 3, 2010 at 1:00 p.m. in the Solitaire Room of the Concourse Hotel. The meeting itself is open to all interested parties, but only those who are dues-paid members of SF3 may vote on resolutions that are presented for consideration. 

SF3 membership dues are as follows:

  • Less than 18 years old - $9.00
  • Basic/Student - $12.00
  • Contributing - $24.00
  • Supporting - $36.00
  • Sustaining - $48.00
  • Patron - $60.00

Membership in SF3 is open to all. If you wish to become a member of SF3 and vote at the October 3 meeting, your dues must be received by an SF3 officer (NOT postmarked!) no later than the beginning of the meeting. Dues should be mailed to SF3, PO Box 1624, Madison, WI 53701-1624. If you are unable to attend the meeting, you may designate a different member of SF3 to vote your proxy. 

The SF3 bylaws, including those governing membership, the use of proxies in voting and other relevant topics may be perused here: http://juliegomoll.com/SF3/about/sf3-bylaws/.

For the first time of which I am aware, the October 3 SF3 meeting will include the use of the conference phone for the convenience of any members who are unable to attend in person. The usual phone number – 800-281-5354, passcode 202847 – is in effect for this meeting.

If you have strong feelings, either pro or con, about the direction that the current co-chair committee is taking with any or all issues involving WisCon, I urge you to become a member of SF3 without delay. The meeting on Sunday, October 3 offers you the very best – indeed, the only – opportunity to be a part of the decision whether to confirm or veto the volunteers who are now in place.

Karen Moore, Corresponding Secretary

The Society for the Furtherance and Study of Fantasy & Science Fiction

(Source: urukcon.dreamwidth.org)

Rochita Leonen-Ruiz, Filipina writer, wrote this scary/delicious one-minute story for Weird Tales Magazine!

quixotess:

so-treu:

herzundseele:

remembertheladies:

“Mrs. Seacole was a Jamaican healer or ‘doctress’ with    expertise in tending victims of cholera    and yellow fever epidemics. When the Crimean War began, Mrs. Seacole went to    London and volunteered her services as a nurse to the War Office, other military    agencies, and Florence Nightingale’s nursing group. She was told by all that    her services were not needed. She went to the Crimea at her own expense and    worked steadfastly to care for the sick and wounded, often going onto the battlefield    to aid the fallen. She became quite well known in the Crimea and back in England.    Her autobiography, The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands,    was published in 1857 and was very popular for a while. Then Mrs. Seacole faded    from public attention for almost 100 years. In the 1970’s Mrs. Seacole was rediscovered    and has become a symbol for Black nurses, civil rights groups, and the women’s    liberation movement.”—Mary Seacole at Victorian Web
See maryseacole.com for an interactive map of her travels and a feature on race in Victorian Britain.



Image Description: an eight panel black and white comic in pen. (At least I think it’s pen.)
Panel one. Mary Seacole approaches a bed in which a white person lies with the covers up to their eyes. Seacole says “Another patient? My, we are busy today.
Panel two. The “patient” sits up. It is Florence Nightingale, smiling triumphantly. She says “HAH!” Seacole frowns and says, “Nightingale? Lord give me patience.”
Panel three. Nightingale: “I’ve exposed you.” Seacole (walking away): “Yes, you’ve exposed me running a hospital.”
Panel four. Seacole: “Speaking of which, I’m busy.” Nightingale’s smile has been replaced with outrage. “Hospital?”
Panel Five. Nightingale stands with her hands on her hips. Seacole tends to a wounded soldier. Nightingale: Whore house is more like it! Don’t think I don’t know what really goes on here!” Seacole: “Looks like a hospital to me.”
Panel six. Seacole and Nightingale confront each other, their faces inches apart. Nightingale: “I told you not to come.” Seacole: “So what if I did?”
Panel seven. Nightingale leans across the bed, thoughtlessly pressing her hand down on the stomach of the wounded soldier, who glares at her. Nightingale points a finger at Seacole. She says “I’m gonna shut this hole down, Seacole! It’s a one horse town for nursing in this war.”
Panel eight. Nightingale has left. Seacole resumes tending to the soldier, who is still glaring. She says “Well! That was sensible.” Soldier: “I’ll tell her where to stick that lamp, Mary.” Seacole: “Thank you dear.”

quixotess:

so-treu:

herzundseele:

remembertheladies:

“Mrs. Seacole was a Jamaican healer or ‘doctress’ with expertise in tending victims of cholera and yellow fever epidemics. When the Crimean War began, Mrs. Seacole went to London and volunteered her services as a nurse to the War Office, other military agencies, and Florence Nightingale’s nursing group. She was told by all that her services were not needed. She went to the Crimea at her own expense and worked steadfastly to care for the sick and wounded, often going onto the battlefield to aid the fallen. She became quite well known in the Crimea and back in England. Her autobiography, The Wonderful Adventures of Mrs. Seacole in Many Lands, was published in 1857 and was very popular for a while. Then Mrs. Seacole faded from public attention for almost 100 years. In the 1970’s Mrs. Seacole was rediscovered and has become a symbol for Black nurses, civil rights groups, and the women’s liberation movement.”

Mary Seacole at Victorian Web

See maryseacole.com for an interactive map of her travels and a feature on race in Victorian Britain.

Image Description: an eight panel black and white comic in pen. (At least I think it’s pen.)

Panel one. Mary Seacole approaches a bed in which a white person lies with the covers up to their eyes. Seacole says “Another patient? My, we are busy today.

Panel two. The “patient” sits up. It is Florence Nightingale, smiling triumphantly. She says “HAH!” Seacole frowns and says, “Nightingale? Lord give me patience.”

Panel three. Nightingale: “I’ve exposed you.” Seacole (walking away): “Yes, you’ve exposed me running a hospital.”

Panel four. Seacole: “Speaking of which, I’m busy.” Nightingale’s smile has been replaced with outrage. “Hospital?”

Panel Five. Nightingale stands with her hands on her hips. Seacole tends to a wounded soldier. Nightingale: Whore house is more like it! Don’t think I don’t know what really goes on here!” Seacole: “Looks like a hospital to me.”

Panel six. Seacole and Nightingale confront each other, their faces inches apart. Nightingale: “I told you not to come.” Seacole: “So what if I did?”

Panel seven. Nightingale leans across the bed, thoughtlessly pressing her hand down on the stomach of the wounded soldier, who glares at her. Nightingale points a finger at Seacole. She says “I’m gonna shut this hole down, Seacole! It’s a one horse town for nursing in this war.”

Panel eight. Nightingale has left. Seacole resumes tending to the soldier, who is still glaring. She says “Well! That was sensible.” Soldier: “I’ll tell her where to stick that lamp, Mary.” Seacole: “Thank you dear.”