Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Jha can has random thoughtz about tapirs, kitties, comics, pretty people, social justice, things in general.

 

Posts tagged CfP

we-got-our-own:

Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Divide
Sisterhood Summit 2013
Call for Submissions

The Black Girl Project (BGP) is holding its third annual Sisterhood Summit, a symposium designed to provide a platform for young women and girls to develop the tools to advocate, express, create and inspire, while also building active and sustainable networks on local, national and global levels, in Brooklyn, NY in October, 2013.  The symposium this year is themed: Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Divide.“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.” - Audre LordeThis year’s summit, is inspired by the reality that Black women and girls* are online and claiming virtual space for themselves! From Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and every “app” we are using AND creating, we are continuing to  push and explore deeper themes of safety, expression, sexuality, love, and identity. The summit is an opportunity for young women and girls to engage in dialogue and interactive workshops that will allow them to ask questions, engage viewpoints, and deepen their insight.
As Black women and girls create history, leaving a legacy of virtual archives, narratives, images, stories, and artifacts, how are we building community with one another and what have we learned along the way? These are some of the questions we’ll be discussing and attempting to find answers to among one another. We are also interested in conversations about online safety, from bullying, identity theft, and accessibility; how do Black women and girls decide what information online is valuable and factual; how has language and communication evolved for Black women and girls; who is still excluded or isolated and how can we make changes to include more fully those members of our communities?This year we welcome parents and caregivers of the young women and girls to be present. There will be a parent track of workshops and tools to support and help facilitate conversations around online safety, new cyber laws, sex/uality, values, and popular culture by those people who work with youth on a regular basis, and even by youth workers themselves!We believe at BGP that it is always important to provide a space for a variety of perspectives to engage, grow, and that through the collective sharing of knowledge, telling of our stories, and standing in solidarity with one another that we are able to enrich, broaden, and transform ourselves and our communities.We are seeking submissions for Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Dividearound the following core pathways:media making 101introduction to using platforms and frameworkssex and representation in media, film, literature, and/or historyconsent online and offlinelaws regarding virtual spacespower and the virtual communitycreating a virtual voiceonline activismhealing from trauma, heartbreak, onlinehuman rights 
anonymity, usernames, and pseudonyms
language online
sextinganti-bullying and building networks of solidarityonline and virtual representations of sex/uality
citations and attribution of online ideas/images/voices
accountability and responsibility online
innovation online
sexual orientation and queerness onlineaccessibilitypeople with disabilities and virtual spaces/accesscopyright, creative commons, and ownership
Additionally, this year, we will have a section of the summit dedicated solely to parents and other adult caretakers.Questions to consider when preparing your submission:-What does it mean for us to have an online presence? 
-What are forms of healing from trauma?-How do we build solidarity virtually/online with communities that are oppressed?-What are essential things to know about being online?-What does intimacy look and feel like online?-Are there forms of pleasure that may be experienced online? 
-What safety and security themes are important to know and be clear on while online?-What are ways we can build virtual and 3D spaces of support?-How do we create media representations that are realistic and represent our experiences?-What are ways we can learn to deconstruct the messages we are sent regarding our gender, race, class, and location online?These submissions can be in the form of presentations, performances, screenings, workshops, panel discussions, and/or interactive installations to name a few.
Submissions should include a 250 word abstract, a resume, accompanying portfolio (if applicable), and a letter of support from a mentor if you are 18 or younger. Application materials should be submitted to this link by July, 6 2013. We encourage applicants abroad to apply as at this year’s conference, we would like to provide an intercultural videoconferencing exchange.

we-got-our-own:

Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Divide

Sisterhood Summit 2013

Call for Submissions

The Black Girl Project (BGP) is holding its third annual Sisterhood Summit, a symposium designed to provide a platform for young women and girls to develop the tools to advocate, express, create and inspire, while also building active and sustainable networks on local, national and global levels, in Brooklyn, NY in October, 2013.  The symposium this year is themed: Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Divide.

“I have come to believe over and over again that what is most important to me must be spoken, made verbal and shared, even at the risk of having it bruised or misunderstood.” - Audre Lorde

This year’s summit, is inspired by the reality that Black women and girls* are online and claiming virtual space for themselves! From Instagram, Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr, and every “app” we are using AND creating, we are continuing to  push and explore deeper themes of safety, expression, sexuality, love, and identity. The summit is an opportunity for young women and girls to engage in dialogue and interactive workshops that will allow them to ask questions, engage viewpoints, and deepen their insight.

As Black women and girls create history, leaving a legacy of virtual archives, narratives, images, stories, and artifacts, how are we building community with one another and what have we learned along the way? These are some of the questions we’ll be discussing and attempting to find answers to among one another. We are also interested in conversations about online safety, from bullying, identity theft, and accessibility; how do Black women and girls decide what information online is valuable and factual; how has language and communication evolved for Black women and girls; who is still excluded or isolated and how can we make changes to include more fully those members of our communities?

This year we welcome parents and caregivers of the young women and girls to be present. There will be a parent track of workshops and tools to support and help facilitate conversations around online safety, new cyber laws, sex/uality, values, and popular culture by those people who work with youth on a regular basis, and even by youth workers themselves!

We believe at BGP that it is always important to provide a space for a variety of perspectives to engage, grow, and that through the collective sharing of knowledge, telling of our stories, and standing in solidarity with one another that we are able to enrich, broaden, and transform ourselves and our communities.

We are seeking submissions for 
Digital Daughters: Black Girls Bridging the Dividearound the following core pathways:

media making 101
introduction to using platforms and frameworks
sex and representation in media, film, literature, and/or history
consent online and offline
laws regarding virtual spaces
power and the virtual community
creating a virtual voice
online activism
healing from trauma, heartbreak, online
human rights 

anonymity, usernames, and pseudonyms

language online

sexting
anti-bullying and building networks of solidarity
online and virtual representations of sex/uality

citations and attribution of online ideas/images/voices

accountability and responsibility online

innovation online

sexual orientation and queerness online
accessibility
people with disabilities and virtual spaces/access
copyright, creative commons, and ownership


Additionally, this year, we will have a section of the summit dedicated solely to parents and other adult caretakers.

Questions to consider when preparing your submission:

-What does it mean for us to have an online presence? 

-What are forms of healing from trauma?
-How do we build solidarity virtually/online with communities that are oppressed?
-What are essential things to know about being online?
-What does intimacy look and feel like online?
-Are there forms of pleasure that may be experienced online? 

-What safety and security themes are important to know and be clear on while online?
-What are ways we can build virtual and 3D spaces of support?
-How do we create media representations that are realistic and represent our experiences?
-What are ways we can learn to deconstruct the messages we are sent regarding our gender, race, class, and location online?

These submissions can be in the form of presentations, performances, screenings, workshops, panel discussions, and/or interactive installations to name a few.


Submissions should include a 250 word abstract, a resume, accompanying portfolio (if applicable), and a letter of support from a mentor if you are 18 or younger. Application materials should be submitted to this link by July, 6 2013. We encourage applicants abroad to apply as at this year’s conference, we would like to provide an intercultural videoconferencing exchange.

(via freshmouthgoddess)

calling all writers of color

adailymishmash:

I was recently contacted about this amazing anthology, Mothership: Tales from Afrofuturism and Beyond, seeking materials “by, for, and/or about persons of color.” Genres they’re interested in include (but are not limited to): science fiction, fantasy, horror, slipstream, weird fiction, and speculative fiction.

Anyways, please check out their website/subscribe to their mailing list, and reblog/pass this on to anyone you know who might be interested!

(via troubledsigh)