Merf. Thinking is Hard.

Jha can has random thoughtz about tapirs, kitties, comics, pretty people, social justice, things in general.

 

Anonymous said: Thoughts on Orion Martin's "X-Men of Color?"

imathers:

aintgotnoladytronblues:

darrylayo:

regarding the article by Orion Martin: http://www.hoodedutilitarian.com/2013/12/what-if-the-x-men-were-black/

Here is my problem and what my problem has always been as a black boy and eventually a black man: discrimination is real but real-life bigotry is based on irrational fear. The “mutants” of the X-Men world are actually horrifying. They are monstrous. They can kill with a thought. They can kill even without a thought, many of these characters have killed people by accident. Because they are monsters with horrific powers that nobody can hope to contain. 

The “mutant” metaphor does not work as a stand-in for bigotry because people in the comic book world have every right to be Absolutely Terrified about the prospect of being blown up, disintegrated, mind-controlled, crushed or slashed up by these superhuman creatures. 

Also insulting is the Xavier character whose plea for “tolerance” centers around the assertion that he would convince these walking weapons of mass destruction to not cause harm to people while also insisting that the free exercise of these devastating abilities is a right that any individual would have. 


I was a black boy and now I’m a black man. There are people who wish me harm and people who would do me harm. But I have no more ability than they do. Bigotry in reality is unjustified. In comic book land, people are (quite rationally) at least suspicious about people who have the ability—no scratch that—the tendency to unleash massive casualties, often by complete accident. Black people cannot blow your head off by just looking at you. 

It’s an exceedingly offensive concept of how bigotry works.

That said, I’ve always enjoyed X-Men comic books and movies for what they were. Even though they are built on a terrible foundation, they’ve got some good and entertaining stories out of it.

ALSO, A L S O … 

I MUST ADD because people keep making this mistake: the idea to make the X-Men explicitly about racism/bigotry wasn’t introduced until a little over a year into the series. In the beginning, the very first issue, you see the X-Men concerned with outcast status and being “freaks” (“freak”ism is a concept that pops up frequently in white speculative fiction) but as Grant Morrison once rightly pointed out, the X-Men’s initial push was more closely associated with generational fears and ideas such as the fear that the Establishment has of Youth, new ideas, new generations. The specific turn toward making the concept focus on racism and bigotry was introduced later, in the first Sentinels storyline (as far as I know).

All apologies to Orion Martin though, I was frustrated by the article because he takes so much of the stuff about X-Men at face value instead of probing deeper. One does not have to simply accept the construct as it is presented. One should question it. Professor X is NOT Martin Luther King Jr. Magneto is NOT Malcolm X. These are stupid and toxic ideas that were introduced by writers who didn’t mean harm but were still perpetuating ridiculous and ultimately disrespectful notions.

I don’t know, the premise of the X-Men is too shaky to critique it as-presented. One must cut past the nonsense.

@darrylayo

it’s worth considering, maybe, who “i can kill you if my temper flares the wrong way but i’m a saint for saving you and how dare you fear and despise me” is actually a message for.

Strong, strong points all around, but for Tara’s last point, cf. this essay on Ender’s Game and who that story is a message for, too. I’m not sure there’s ever such a thing as a harmless power fantasy, but if there is, these aren’t it.

blackfolksmakingcomics:

Lightning.

Amanda Waller.

Milestone Media’s Rocket.

Thunder.

Bumblebee.

Vixen.

Representation matters, kids. 

(Source: fanbingblink, via witchsistah)

jeeyonmakes:

Little doodle of a tapir, at my friend Jha’s prompting.

squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

jeeyonmakes:

Little doodle of a tapir, at my friend Jha’s prompting.

squeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!

motionjessinwhite:

anotherpunk:

"Your dress is too short."

Thanks, the designer used your dick for inspiration.

OH MYG OD

(via nethilia)

Supporting Authors When You Can’t Buy Their Books

se-smith:

Supporting Authors When You Can’t Buy Their Books

For authors, survival in the publishing world is mediated by a number of factors, but one of the most important is sales. If people are buying your books, your publisher is interested in acquiring more of your books and producing them. If people are not, and you’re not earning out your advances, you’re of less interest to your publisher, and you’re going to have to work harder to find a home for…

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sawdustbear:

actually, no, i think this self masturbatory dancing vulva with a two day unshaven pubic mound and a face may be my greatest accomplishment.

…. is it doing karaoke or is that a hitachi wand?

sawdustbear:

actually, no, i think this self masturbatory dancing vulva with a two day unshaven pubic mound and a face may be my greatest accomplishment.

…. is it doing karaoke or is that a hitachi wand?

sourcedumal:

lady-yuna:

2srooky:

mockingatlas:

prismatic-bell:

Can we just stop and talk about this for a minute?

Thresh doesn’t make an alliance. Thresh doesn’t waste time liking her. Thresh knows that either he must kill her or she must kill him for one of them to win.

But this is the only way he can repay her for protecting Rue when he couldn’t. It’s the only way he can repay her for honoring Rue when he couldn’t. He honors her by sparing her friend, the girl who would have died for her.

The revolution really doesn’t start with Katniss.

It starts with Rue.

SOMEBODY FINALLY SAID IT

This is exactly the point I’ve been trying to make for years. Okay, so the revolution gets it’s kindling with Katniss. She volunteers, well that’s new, she rebels in the display of talents by shooting the apple. This triggers her perfect score, okay. These aren’t really “Revolutionary” though. 

It’s not even revolutionary when Peeta professes his love, because, let’s face it, the rules of the game haven’t changed. They’re still just two kids who would have to KILL each other to win. Without a doubt, it would bring some interest to the games, so the Capitol makes propaganda about it. The “Star Crossed Lovers” in a game of life and death.

But what changes the game is Rue. Right away from her introduction in the books we know Rue is going to be somewhat of a big deal. She was compared to the most important character to Katniss, Prim, so that’s a huge indicator. She’s small, young, she’s what Prim would have been.

So Katniss instantly feels a subconscious pull toward her. 

When they meet in the trees, Katniss could have killed Rue easily, and Rue probably could have pulled a sneak attack or alerted the Careers of Katniss’s presence. Instead, Rue points out the Tracker Jacker nest.

Then it escalates, Rue and Katniss become an odd team, they’re an alliance, which is never new in the Hunger Games, as forming teams and then betraying them at the end seems to be a common, but there’s is different. It’s close, it’s sisterly, protective.

And then Rue get’s impaled. Katniss kills her first tribute with ease after that. Comparing it to hunting game. Katniss holds Rue, she cries, and then she sings. She sings for Rue a song of promised safety and warmth, something completely absent in the arena. 

And this is where the metaphorical canon fires. Katniss could have left Rue, the hovercraft would have been along to pick her up, but she can’t. She’s morally obligated to love this girl as much as possible. And this is where the revolution starts. 

She honors the dead. She honors a dead tribute from a district she’d never seen, a person she’d known for only a short period of time. But she throws away Hunger Games norms. She rejects them completely.

In the Hunger Games you’re supposed to kill mercilessly and leave the victims for the plain box they’re shipped home in. 

Katniss gives Rue a funeral in the Games, she decorates the body, she makes it look like Rue is sleeping. Like no harm had come. Katniss just ignited the coals that Rue had placed.

Rue’s District sends a parachute. Homemade bread. 

Then Thresh kills Clove and distracts Cato by taking his bag. 

The fire is going now, and the actions in Catching Fire are even more obvious.

The Speech for Rue. Peeta’s painting. Everything eludes back to this one little girl who became Katniss’s family.

So the revolution never started with Katniss, she was just the tinder for Rue’s ignition. 

Rue was the real Mockingjay.

Also, who’s four note whistle is constantly attached to the trailers?

Rue’s whistle.

Rue is omnipresent in the books and movies, and I absolutely love it.

The rebellion was started because the innocence of a black girl was defiled.

That is a powerful statement that a lot of people gloss over for this book

(Source: taylor-swift, via artisansoulleader)

sourcedumal:

leafwhirlwind:

Very important

Look at the pure joy on these children’s faces.

sourcedumal:

leafwhirlwind:

Very important

Look at the pure joy on these children’s faces.

(Source: bythepowercosmic, via a-spoon-is-born)

sourcedumal:

rebellatis:

No because there’s no reason to “hang out” at an ex’s house fuck that shit

See I dont like this because I feel like if she had said “no I am not ok with this” he would have tried to gaslight her with some “oh you dont trust our love” type shit.

what @sourcedumal said 
i hope she dumped his ass though because that is a ridiculous question gesturing to a desire to get away with shenanigans like what kind of boyfriend asks questions like that 

sourcedumal:

rebellatis:

No because there’s no reason to “hang out” at an ex’s house fuck that shit

See I dont like this because I feel like if she had said “no I am not ok with this” he would have tried to gaslight her with some “oh you dont trust our love” type shit.

what @sourcedumal said 

i hope she dumped his ass though because that is a ridiculous question gesturing to a desire to get away with shenanigans like what kind of boyfriend asks questions like that 

(Source: samperkins99, via artisansoulleader)

zuky:

Let’s talk about the racist notion, deeply embedded in US culture, of Asians as perpetual foreigners. Specifically, maybe you heard about this massive facepalm from US Congress just last week.
At a congressional hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday, July 24, 2014, Florida Republican Congressman Curt Clawson (above, left) addressed Nisha Biswal (right) and Arun Kumar, two US citizens and senior officials working for the US State Department and US Commerce Department, with these words:

“I’m familiar with your country. I love your country. Anything I can do to make the relationship with India better, I’m willing and enthusiastic about doing so. Just as your capital is welcome here to produce good-paying jobs in the U.S., I’d like our capital to be welcome there. I ask cooperation and commitment and priority from your government in so doing.”

Needless to say, Biswal and Kumar are Indian Americans who hold senior position within the US government, and were introduced as such at the hearing, but the Tea Party Congressman repeatedly spoke to them about India as “your country” and “your government”. An incredibly awkward silence was finally broken when Biswal said: “I think your question is to the Indian government.”

zuky:

Let’s talk about the racist notion, deeply embedded in US culture, of Asians as perpetual foreigners. Specifically, maybe you heard about this massive facepalm from US Congress just last week.

At a congressional hearing of the House Foreign Affairs Committee on Thursday, July 24, 2014, Florida Republican Congressman Curt Clawson (above, left) addressed Nisha Biswal (right) and Arun Kumar, two US citizens and senior officials working for the US State Department and US Commerce Department, with these words:

“I’m familiar with your country. I love your country. Anything I can do to make the relationship with India better, I’m willing and enthusiastic about doing so. Just as your capital is welcome here to produce good-paying jobs in the U.S., I’d like our capital to be welcome there. I ask cooperation and commitment and priority from your government in so doing.”

Needless to say, Biswal and Kumar are Indian Americans who hold senior position within the US government, and were introduced as such at the hearing, but the Tea Party Congressman repeatedly spoke to them about India as “your country” and “your government”. An incredibly awkward silence was finally broken when Biswal said: “I think your question is to the Indian government.”